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Luke was peculiar when...  

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Zanza
(@zanza)
Honorable Member

...it came to money. Nobody could call Luke stingy, or miserly, or materialistic. He was generous to a fault and I'm of the opinion that he would have had a lot more ready money if he wasn't constantly taking in strays who needed a helping hand. That said, Luke did have his quirks about money. In the beginning of The Prisoner, he was buying shirts for Mark that were so big Millie had to take them in.

In The Actress, he was hounding Jacob Black to sell him a piece of land for a "fair price." Luke's idea of a fair price and Jacob's idea of a fair price were two entirely different ideas, and I didn't think Luke sounded very reasonable that Jacob should sell at Luke's price because Jacob had no use for the land. People don't have to have a use for something that belongs to them, and if they want to sell that item at a high price, that's their business. We have a free market economy and I doubt Luke would appreciate somebody buying his cows at a lower price than he was willing to sell them for because the other person thought his price was not fair.

In Short Rope for a Tall Man, Ben Crown had a point when he said that twenty-five dollars a head for horses that were worth a hundred a head half broke wasn't honest. If somebody is offering to sell a solid gold Rolex for a hundred dollars, you know there's something wrong with that watch. Luke wanted to pay a "fair price" and I think he knew perfectly well he was under-valuing those horses. He was so thrilled with Mark for getting them that he didn't really examine the integrity of the sale but I'm not sure he would have done that even if he was the one who got the horses for the price he wanted to pay. He was stuck on his "fair price."

I suppose like the rest of us, Luke sometimes had blinkers on when it came to money. Like in Miss Milly, when Mark asked Luke why he didn't just pay Milly because he had the money, he said something about having the money but not having it to spend. He wanted to wait and sell a cow first. That would have been fine with Hattie but Milly was new in town. Yes, she was being unreasonable. No, Luke was not helping the situation by being stubborn about the money. And in Meeting at Midnight, Luke squalled about his store money when Micah said how much it would cost to bail out his friend, Tom Benton. There's an example of generosity and parsimony all rolled into one. Luke was determined to get his friend out of jail but he was quibbling at the cost. If someone else was doing that, Luke would be the first one to say that if the friend was so important, the proper bail should be paid. I'm just rolling some ideas around here, does anyone have any thoughts on this?

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Posted : 24/08/2020 2:42 pm
lilyrose
(@lilyrose)
Honorable Member

I agree Zanza! Lucas was peculiar...

With a smile on my face, I wake up to a brand new day.

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Posted : 25/08/2020 7:50 am
Dana2020
(@dana2020)
Reputable Member Alumni

Zanza, I know we have talked about Lucas lecturing Millie about accepting credit and giving of herself. Certainly, Millie did not seem to have put a lot of thought into what it means to buy a store. Millie did a stupid, stupid thing by hiring that "collection" company. I guess what bothered me was talking down to Millie from his high horse and not realizing Millie might be in a bit of a financial bind when she was new in the business world.

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Posted : 25/08/2020 8:35 pm
Zanza
(@zanza)
Honorable Member

Zanza, I know we have talked about Lucas lecturing Millie about accepting credit and giving of herself. Certainly, Millie did not seem to have put a lot of thought into what it means to buy a store. Millie did a stupid, stupid thing by hiring that "collection" company. I guess what bothered me was talking down to Millie from his high horse and not realizing Millie might be in a bit of a financial bind when she was new in the business world.
Exactly. And if Luke hadn't been in one of his "money is for keeping, not spending" moods, he probably wouldn't have been so hostile. Of course he'd had some tough times in his life. Like in A Matter of Faith where he talked about how his mother didn't have a new dress for three years because his father wasted money on somebody who promised to find water. Still, it bothered me too that Luke got right up in Millie's grill like he did, especially when he had the money to pay her. He could have given her some money and then she might have been willing to listen to him. A little give and take would have done wonders at that point and then Millie wouldn't have hire those two scallywags and that farmer wouldn't have gotten hurt.

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Posted : 25/08/2020 9:51 pm
Dana2020
(@dana2020)
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This is one of Lucas's "do as I say not as I do" episodes. We also do not know if Millie had experienced financial hardship in her life. Also, "realistically" some of the town denizens must have been deadbeats. Millie's comeback line: "Mr. McCain, since you have such trust in your neighbors, it sounds like you would be willing to be a co-signer on their accounts."

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Posted : 29/08/2020 1:50 pm
Zanza
(@zanza)
Honorable Member

This is one of Lucas's "do as I say not as I do" episodes. We also do not know if Millie had experienced financial hardship in her life. Also, "realistically" some of the town denizens must have been deadbeats. Millie's comeback line: "Mr. McCain, since you have such trust in your neighbors, it sounds like you would be willing to be a co-signed on their accounts."
Oh, boy, if Millie said for Luke to co-sign the accounts he would have a stroke on the spot. :laughingcowboy: Luke did have some of those "Do as I say, not as I do" moments. The most glaring was Smokescreen, when the bereaved father wanted to kill the man who murdered his daughter, and Luke was so tiresome and solemn about how he would ruin his life and maybe hang if he committed murder. I think Luke must have completely forgotten the events of Eight Hours to Die, when he tried to throttle a man that he thought shot Mark; The Raid, when he did kill a man who kidnapped Mark; Trail of Hate, where he tortured three men who held Mark hostage; and the list goes on. Luke had a Berserk Button when it came to Mark and it's nightmare fuel to think how narrowly he escaped from being arrested and charged himself with murder and/or attempted murder when he lost his temper on somebody who did something to Mark.

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Posted : 29/08/2020 1:58 pm
Dana2020
(@dana2020)
Reputable Member Alumni

Zanza, one of my goals for 2021, is to write some fan fiction. To his credit, Lucas was not a gossip, but some people in North Fork must have been. Anyways, I would like to write some Western Greek Chorus stories-hey I just thought of a name The Corral Chorus, where townspeople give their version of events.

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Posted : 29/08/2020 2:13 pm
Zanza
(@zanza)
Honorable Member

The Corral Chorus is an interesting idea. Micah was a mean drunk and as the saying goes, in vino veritas. He was hardly the only person to give Luke a "The reason you suck" speech. We generally only see Luke through Mark's eyes. Exploring different viewpoints of North Fork could be promising if it's done right.

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Posted : 29/08/2020 3:30 pm
Dana2020
(@dana2020)
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Not really a money thing, but what about Legacy? I understand Lucas acted on impulse in this one. Lucas had the best intentions. However, did Lucas stop to think pretending to be partners with Pop might come back to bite him. Sure, Phillip was opportunistic, but as Micah said the law does not take personalities into account. Lucas was not trying to defraud Phillip, but Lucas definitely misrepresented himself. When Phillip stated he wanted to have the ranch assessed, that was something he would have had every right to do.

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Posted : 30/08/2020 5:12 pm
Zanza
(@zanza)
Honorable Member

In all reasonableness, if Pop's son was not such a jerk, it would not have been a problem for Luke to let Pop have his little deception. That wasn't a problem caused by Luke not thinking, it was a problem caused by Pop's son Philip. He couldn't have cared less about his father, yet he was willing to try and charge the Mitchell boys with murder. And he didn't really need or want half Luke's ranch but he was willing to wreak havoc trying to get it. When you come down to it Philip was a brutal man, every bit as nasty as any other outlaw that rode in to North Fork trying to steal something or kill someone. I always felt that his turnaround at the end was not a matter of him suddenly growing a conscience and a heart but rather him knowing that he had taken things as far as they could go. Realistically he knew that a jury would not convict the Mitchell boys of murder when Pop drank himself to death, and he knew trying to take half of Luke's ranch would not hold up in court either. That said, Luke was a man of integrity and he did know he was putting himself in the wrong to lie to Pop's son.

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Posted : 30/08/2020 5:27 pm
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