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The Great Hangings of 1862  

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Zanza
(@zanza)
Gunfighter

Jim Conley was sentenced to a year in jail in 1914 for being an accomplice in the murder of Mary Phagan. Historians believe he was the actual murderer and that Leo Frank was completely innocent.

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Posted : 16/09/2020 7:10 am
Zanza
(@zanza)
Gunfighter

I am paraphrasing, but Governor Slaton stated he could plant, he could how, he could farm, but he could not abide the company of a guilty conscience. Governor Slaton spoke of another governor who turned another Jew over to a mob and that governor's name is a curse.
I always feel a little sorry for Governor Slaton. He stated that instead of commuting Leo Frank's sentence he would have issued a full pardon but he was convinced that Frank was going to be able to prove his innocence with legal proceedings. I guess he felt that a pardon is something you only give a guilty man but it would have been better for Frank to have that stain on his character than a rope around his neck. It was just a very sad thing all around. They made a miniseries out of the incident. https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0095678/

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Posted : 16/09/2020 7:13 am
Dana2020
(@dana2020)
Reputable Member Alumni

Governor Slaton was a rising member of the Democratic party, but he never held public office again. He credited his wife for helping him reach his decision to commute Leo Frank's sentence. Mrs. Slaton stated she would rather be the widow of brave man than the wife of a coward.

If I remember correctly, Jim Conley lived at least until the 1950's. The Leo Frank case was one of the first cases where testimony of an African-American was used to convict a caucasian.

Jack Lemmon and Peter Gallagher were awesome in the movie!

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Posted : 16/09/2020 10:09 pm
Zanza
(@zanza)
Gunfighter

Governor Slaton was a rising member of the Democratic party, but he never held public office again. He credited his wife for helping him reach his decision to commute Leo Frank's sentence. Mrs. Slaton stated she would rather be the widow of brave man than the wife of a coward.
Mrs Slaton must have been quite a woman. As for the governor, he may have lost his career but he saved his soul. How hard it must have been to do the right thing in the face of all that opposition but he was very fortunate in that his wife was solidly behind him.

If I remember correctly, Jim Conley lived at least until the 1950's. The Leo Frank case was one of the first cases where testimony of an African-American was used to convict a caucasian.
It's also worth noting that it's a case where a white man was lynched for the crime of a black man, which is a sad lesson in how lynching is not about race but rather how crazy people get when mob justice is involved and how anyone can become a victim. Clarence Thomas specifically called his Supreme Court hearing a high-tech lynching and we see a lot of mob justice today on the Internet. It seems like it's something that we always have to guard against, the urge to rush to justice and take revenge.

Jack Lemmon and Peter Gallagher were awesome in the movie!
Incredible movie. Peter gave a bravura performance as Leo Frank, particularly the lynching scene.

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Posted : 17/09/2020 6:58 am
Dana2020
(@dana2020)
Reputable Member Alumni

Has anyone else read Eternity Street by John Mack Father? It is a book about early Los Angeles. Extralegal justice, a euphemism for lynching, was a not that uncommon and accepted thing for a long time.

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Posted : 19/09/2020 6:15 pm
Judy
 Judy
(@judy)
Micah Torrance Ranch Hand, Alumni

Has anyone else read Eternity Street by John Mack Father? It is a book about early Los Angeles. Extralegal justice, a euphemism for lynching, was a not that uncommon and accepted thing for a long time.

No, I haven't read it, but it sounds as if it should be a must read.

In remembrance of my beloved son: "Vaya Con Dios" (Spanish, meaning "Go with God"), by Anne Murray ( https://tinyurl.com/y8nvqqx9 )“God has you in heaven, but I have you in my heart.” ~ by TobyMac ( https://tinyurl.com/rakc5nd )

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Posted : 19/09/2020 6:33 pm
Zanza
(@zanza)
Gunfighter

Has anyone else read Eternity Street by John Mack Father? It is a book about early Los Angeles. Extralegal justice, a euphemism for lynching, was a not that uncommon and accepted thing for a long time.
I have not read the book but I remember the scene in True Grit where the hanging was carried out and it was a festive occasion with food and drinks being sold and women and children present. People used to take their kids to public executions. And I remember when I saw The Ox-Bow incident on TCM the presenter talked about Henry Fonda seeing a lynching as a child. Apparently his father was a newspaperman and thought for some reason his son should have that experience. Don't forget they would take pictures of the lynching victim and spread them around as souvenirs. As for lynching being an accepted thing, like I said, it's still perfectly acceptable for Internet rage mobs to go after people. Mob justice has moved online but it's still mob justice: vicious, unreasoning, and completely capable of destroying someone's life. Lynching is still a part of our society.

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Posted : 19/09/2020 7:01 pm
Dana2020
(@dana2020)
Reputable Member Alumni

Man, I am a lousy typist! The actual last name of the author of the book is Farager. The lynching information is just a small part of the book.it also talks a lot about the settlement and growth of Los Angeles.

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Posted : 19/09/2020 8:25 pm
Judy
 Judy
(@judy)
Micah Torrance Ranch Hand, Alumni

Thanks for the correction, Dana. :happycowboy:

In remembrance of my beloved son: "Vaya Con Dios" (Spanish, meaning "Go with God"), by Anne Murray ( https://tinyurl.com/y8nvqqx9 )“God has you in heaven, but I have you in my heart.” ~ by TobyMac ( https://tinyurl.com/rakc5nd )

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Posted : 20/09/2020 5:02 am
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